Citizen Science

Discovery Lab is participating in Citizen Science month!

Below you will find a variety of resources that will allow you to participate.

Submit your precipitation data to citizenscience@discoverylab.org

Participants will use visualizations to explore potential vulnerabilities to city infrastructures, social networks, and ecosystems from sea level rise, extreme precipitation, drought, and extreme heat, then discuss potential strategies for addressing these threats, focusing on the priorities and needs of relevant stakeholders. At the event’s conclusion, participants will make recommendations for increasing their city’s community resilience.

Extreme Precipitation

Make a rain gauge with Dr. Ray Vandiver using a few simple items. Learn the importance of tracking weather to study our climate.

  • PK.S.2 Make observations of the physical and natural world.
  • 2.ESS1.1 Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.
  • 3.ESS2.1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
  • 4.ESS3.2 Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.
  • 5.ESS3.1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environments.
  • 6.ESS2.4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
  • 6.ESS3.2 Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects

Make your own rain cloud in a jar with just a few household items.

  • PK.S.6 Engage in investigations based on curiosity and wondering about the physical and natural world.
  • K.ESS.2.1 Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time.
  • 2.ESS1.1 Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly.